Thursday, 30 April 2020

What Is the Capital of South Carolina?

The South Carolina State House
in Columbia, South Carolina.
The capital city of South Carolina is Columbia.

The state of South Carolina is is bordered by Georgia, North Carolina and the Atlantic Ocean. South Carolina's state capital is Columbia. The University of South Carolina is in Columbia, as well as some historical sites, museums, and parks. Like many places and things bearing the name, Columbia is named for Christopher Columbus.

History

Columbia is known to have been a home for Congaree people before the Europeans settled in the area. The earliest records of Europeans to cross the area were the Spanish in 1540. In 1754 the colonial government established a ferry in the area. In 1786, State Senator, John Lewis, proposed a bill to create a state capital, and Columbia became the capital of South Carolina. Columbia experienced growth in the years that followed, particularly because of the Congaree River. Population growth in the city increased because of the railroad that facilitated transport. Santee Canal provided a direct route to Charleston. The Canal is 22 miles long and connected Cooper and Santee Rivers, and it was first built in 1786 coming to completion in 1800, becoming one of the earliest canals in the US. In 1805 Columbia was incorporated as a town and in 1854 as a city. The University of Southern Carolina (formally the South Carolina College), located in Columbia, was founded in 1801. The population began to increase in the early 1850s as more slaves were brought to work in Columbia.

Geography and Climate

Columbia is located in a flat terrain where Congaree River flows. Columbia is 134.9 square miles in area, and it has an elevation reaching 293 feet above sea level. The climate of Columbia is hot and characterized by cold winters and hot summers. The rains start from May to July with receiving approximately 44.6 inches annually. June is the hottest month of the year in Columbia as it records a temperature of 109 °F and February the coldest with a temperature of up to -2 °F.

Population

As of 2010, the population of Columbia was 129,272, an 18.8% increase from 2000. Columbia is estimated to have a population of 134,309 as of 2016. The majority of the population in Columbia is female and from the statistics from the Columbia metropolitan statistical, 29 years is the median age in the city.

Economy

The location of Columbia facilitated its growth making the city center for trading and the river, Congaree River, made transportation easy and convenient. South Carolina's state government is one of the employers for the labor force in City. Columbia is home to many large companies that provide employment opportunities to the people of Columbia. Some of the employers in Columbia include Fortune 1000 company, the University of South Carolina, Fort Jackson, Track Tech and United Parcel Service. The gross domestic product (GDP) of Columbia in 2010 was approximately $31.90 billion.

Government

The government of Columbia is run by a council-manager type of government, and Stephen K. Benjamin is the current mayor. The council acts as the main body that governs the city by making rules and laws to run the city. The council is elected after every four years.

•By Benjamin Elisha Sawe

•culled from www.worldatlas.com

The Biggest Cities In South Carolina

Downtown Columbia, the largest city
and capital of South Carolina
Columbia is South Carolina's biggest city.

The Southern US state of South Carolina is home to a population of 4,625,401 inhabitants. It is the country’s 24th most populous state. With an area of 77,856.9 square km, it is the 40th most extensive US state. South Carolina has 46 counties and 269 incorporated municipalities. Although these municipalities cover only 5.8% of the state’s total land mass, they host 35.4% of the population. The municipalities can vote to be designated as a city or a town but there are no legal differences between the two as per state laws. The municipalities can also choose to have one of three forms of government, council-manager, mayor-council, or council.

Biggest Cities in South Carolina

1. Columbia

Columbia, the capital city of South Carolina, is the largest city in the state. The 2010 Census found the city’s population to be 129,272 individuals. Columbia serves as the seat of the Richland County and a part of it extends into Lexington County. It is the primary city of South Carolina’s Midlands region and is situated at the confluence of two rivers, the Broad River and the Saluda River. These rivers merge to form the Congaree River. The University of South Carolina is also based in Columbia. Fort Jackson, the country’s biggest Basic Combat Training facility, is also located in the city.

2. Charleston

With a population of 120,083 individuals, Charleston is the state’s second most populated city. It is also the oldest city in South Carolina and the county seat of Charleston County. It was established in 1670 as Charles Town. Today, it is located on the Charleston Harbor along the state’s coastline on the Atlantic Ocean. In 1783, Charleston was incorporated as a city. It is known for its rich and well-preserved history and hospitable people. Over the years, Charleston has earned numerous accolades including "America's Most Friendly [City]” title by Travel + Leisure in 2011.

3. North Charleston

North Charleston is the third most populated city in South Carolina. It is home to a population of 97,471 people. The city spreads into three counties, Dorchester, Berkeley, and Charleston. The city was incorporated in 1972 and since then it has experienced rapid population growth. North Charleston is one of South Carolina’s major industrial hubs and has the highest gross retail sales in the city.

4. Mount Pleasant

The suburban town of Mount Pleasant is South Carolina’s fourth-biggest urban area. It had a population of 67,843 individuals in 2010. It is located in Charleston County on the east side of the Charleston Harbor.

5. Rock Hill

With a population of 66,154 individuals, Rock Hill is South Carolina’s fifth most populous city. It is located in York County where it offers scenic views of the Catawba River’s riverfront. 31 parks, numerous nature trails, and restaurants dot the city. The Winthrop University, a liberal arts university founded in the 19th century, is located here.

The Smallest Municipalities in South Carolina

With only 45 residents, Smyrna is the least populous municipality in the state. Jenkinsville, South Carolina’s smallest municipality by area, occupies an area of only 0.23 square km.

The Biggest Cities In South Carolina

Rank Name Government type County Population (2010)
Land area (2010) in km2

1 Columbia Council-manager Lexington Richland 1,29,272342.4
2 Charleston Mayor-council Berkeley Charleston1,20,083282.3
3 North Charleston Mayor-council Berkeley Charleston Dorchester 97,471189.6
4 Mount Pleasant Council Charleston 67,843116.8
5 Rock Hill Council-manager York 66,15492.5
6 Greenville Council-manager Greenville 58,40974.3
7 Summerville Council Berkeley Charleston Dorchester 43,39246.7
8 Sumter Council-manager Sumter 40,52483.1
9 Hilton Head Island Council-manager Beaufort 37,099107.1
10 Florence Council-manager Florence 37,05654.1

•By Oishimaya Sen Nag

•culled from www.worldatlas.com



Wednesday, 29 April 2020

What Is the Capital of Rhode Island?

The evening skyline of Providence, Rhode Island.
The capital city of Rhode Island is Providence.

The state of Rhode Island is located in the northeast United States. Providence is the capital of Rhode Island, and the city has an area of about 20.5 square miles and a population of about 179,154, which makes it the most populated city in the state.

History

In 1636, Roger Williams left Massachusetts Bay Colony due to religious persecution, and eventually settled the area now known as Providence as a religious refuge. The state of Rhode Island was one of the original thirteen colonies that declared independence from Britain, and was involved in the American Revolution. After the war, Providence was the ninth largest city in the newly formed United States of America, and was officially incorporated as a city in 1832.

Economy

Providence's early economy was highly dependent of the manufacturing, especially metals, silverware, jewelry and textiles, jewelry, and textiles. Although the silverware and jewelry industries continue to exist in Providence, the economy has expanded to include health care eduction and government services. The city is also serves as the headquarters for numerous large corporations, including Textron, which is a Fortune 500 company, United Natural Foods, and Nortech, and Citizen's Bank.

Climate

The climate in Providence is categorized as humid continental, which means the city experiences warm summers and cold winters, with consistently high humidity levels throughout the year. Given its proximity to the eastern seaboard, Providence receives high levels of precipitation, but is generally warmer than other states in the New England region.

Culture

Providence offers a variety of ethnic neighbourhoods and is described as being "littered" with restaurants and cafes. The city is has a growing gay and lesbian population, and was rated as one of the "Best Lesbian Places to Live." Similarly, Providence elected an openly gay mayor in 2010. The city also has a variety of historic sites, including the First Baptist Church in America, the Old State House and St. Peter's Basilica.

•By Benjamin Elisha Sawe

•culled from www.worldatlas.com

The Largest Cities in Rhode Island

Providence, Rhode Island.
Rhode Island is the smallest state in the United States by land area. The largest cities in Rhode Island include Providence and Warwick.

Rhode Island is one of the least populated states in the U.S and the smallest in terms of land area. Located in the northeastern end of United States, Rhode Island is subdivided into 39 municipalities and ruled by town administrators. There are various cities with the largest and capital city being Providence. Other cities include Warwick, Cranston, Pawtucket and East Providence.

The 5 Largest Cities in Rhode Island

Providence

Providence is one of the oldest cities in the U.S., having been founded in 1636. It was named in honor of “God’s merciful providence” by a Baptist theologian known as Roger Williams after he landed there as an exile seeker from Massachusetts Bay Colony. The city is located near the mouth of the Providence River near the Narragansett Bay. The population has, over the years, increased steadily to 178,042 making it the most populated city in Rhode Island.

Warwick

Warwick is the second largest city in Rhode Island with 82,672 people according to the 2010 census. The population density is 2,328.8 people per square miles. Located in Kent County, the city is 12 miles south of Providence city, 63 miles southwest of Boston and 171 miles northeast of New York City.

Cranston

Cranston, previously known as Pawtuxet, is the third largest city in Rhode Island with over 80,387 inhabitants according to 2010 census. It covers a total area of 29.9 square miles with land being 28.6 square miles and water covering 1.4 square miles. Cranston was in 2006 classified as one of the safest places and one of the “100 Best Places to Live” according to the Money Magazine of U.S. Founded in 1754, the city was officially incorporated as a city in March 1910 and is governed by a mayor

Pawtucket

As the fourth largest city, Pawtucket covers a total area of 9 square miles with a population of 71,148. Industrialization and farming led to the growth of the city in the 18th century.

East Providence City

East Providence is the fifth largest city occupying an area of 16.61 square miles. The city has 47,037 dwellers. The main villages making up the city are Riverside, Rumford, and East Providence center.

Other Cities in Rhode Island

Woonsocket is the sixth largest city with 41,186 people followed by Coventry which has 35,014 inhabitants. Cumberland, with a total population of 33,507, is ranked eighth while North Providence and South Kingstown are ranked ninth and tenth with a population of 32,078 and 30,639 respectively.

Major Economic Activities in Rhode Island Cities

The major economic activities in coastal cities are centered on fishing. Industrial revolution contributed to the growth of the cities with manufacturing majoring on textiles, silverware, shipbuilding, metalwork, and toolmaking. Currently, the backbone of the economy is based on services such as education, tourism, commerce, and healthcare. The government employs a huge chunk of the population in its numerous departments across all the cities.

The Largest Cities in Rhode Island

Rank City Population

1 Providence 178,042
2 Warwick 82,672
3 Cranston 80,387
4 Pawtucket 71,148
5 East Providence 47,037
6 Woonsocket 41,186
7 Coventry 35,014
8 Cumberland 33,506
9 North Providence 32,078
10 South Kingstown 30,639

•By Daniel Maina Wambugu

•culled from www.worldatlas.com




Saturday, 25 April 2020

What Is the Capital of Pennsylvania?

The state flag of Pennsylvania.
The capital city of Pennsylvania is Harrisburg.

The United States Of America

The state of Pennsylvania is located in the northeastern United States. Harrisburg is the state capital, and is located west of Philadelphia. The city's total ares is 11.86 square miles, 25% of which is water. Harrisburg is known for its diverse population, and was ranked by Forbes in 2010 as the second best place to raise a family in the US. Although the city experienced financial problems in 2010, it was ranked among the recession proof metropolitan areas in the country.

History of the Capital of Pennsylvania

Native Americans inhabited the area presently known as Pennsylvania as early ad 3000 BC. This general area was known as “Pextang” to the inhabitants, and served as a resting place for Native American traders who traveled from as far as the Ohio River. In 1719, English trader, John Harris, Sr., visited the area and settled there, purchasing large areas of land over a 14 year period. Several years later, his son John Harris, Jr., inherited the land and named it Harrisburg, in his memory. It became incorporated after William Malaysia surveyed it, and was then named the capital of Pennsylvania in 1812. Harrisburg was a major contributor to the American civil war due to its strategic proximity to the Susquehanna River. Therefore, the city suffered mild attacks during this period, which slowed industrial growth. But in 1850, the city experienced an industrial rise in the steel industry. Other industries also grew after World War II, and the industrial growth of Harrisburg became steady.

Geography of Harrisburg

To the west of Harrisburg is the Cumberland Valley, and to the east lies Lebanon Valley. To the north is the famous Susquehanna River and the Blue Mountain Ridge. The neighboring counties are Dauphin, Northumberland, Schuylkill, Lancaster, York, Cumberland, Perry, and Lebanon.

Demographics of Harrisburg

According to The United States Census Bureau, Harrisburg has a population of 48,904, which makes it the tenth largest city in Pennsylvania. More than 50% of the population is Black or African-American, 30% are of Caucasian descent, 18% are Hispanic and Latino, and the remaining small percentage belongs to other ethnic groups. It has the largest population of Pennsylvania Dutch. Furthermore, the Bureau also found out that for every 100 women there are 88.7 men.

Government of Harrisburg

Harrisburg has a municipal government with independent executive and legislature branches. The administrative center is the Martin Luther King Jr. City Government Center. The current mayor is the head of the government, and has an unlimited four-year term, and supervises the 34 business entities of the state. The current mayor of Harrisburg is Eric R. Papenfuse.

Culture of Harrisburg

The city is home to several cultural attractions such as the Whitaker Centre for Science and the Arts, Harrisburg Symphony Orchestra, and the annual Pennsylvania Farm Show. The Pennsylvania Farm show attracts farmers from all over the United States who come to showcase animals in various competitions. The city is also a known tourist attraction for its recreational parks, lakes, and beaches. Additionally, the museums represent the rich history of both Pennsylvania and Harrisburg. One example is the National Civil War Museum.

•By Benjamin Elisha Sawe

•culled from www.worldatlas.com

The 10 Biggest Cities In Pennsylvania

Downtown Philadelphia along the Schuylkill River.
Philadelphia is the biggest city in Pennsylvania.

The US state of Pennsylvania is located in the Mid-Atlantic and northeastern regions of the country. The state has an area of 119,283 square km that makes it the country’s 33rd most extensive state. With a population of around 12,807,060 people, it is the country's 5th most populated state. Pennsylvania has 67 counties that include numerous municipalities in the form of townships, cities, or boroughs. Philadelphia is the most populous county of the state while Cameron with a population of only 5,085 people is the smallest county. Pennsylvania has 56 cities classified as first, second, or third-class cities on the basis of their population. Philadelphia is the only first-class city in the state.

Five Most Populated Cities In Pennsylvania

1. Philadelphia

Philadelphia is the most populated city of Pennsylvania. It has a population of 1,580,863 individuals. It is the country’s sixth largest city. The city is coterminous with Philadelphia County. It is the hub of culture and economy in the Delaware Valley. Philadelphia was founded by the English in 1682 to serve as the capital of the Pennsylvania Colony. It later played a very significant role in the American Revolution and served as the meeting place for the Founding Fathers of the US. Today, Philadelphia is a major economic hub and a top study destination. It has a greater number of outdoor murals and sculptures than any other city in the country. It is a major tourist destination and home to many firsts in the country.

2. Pittsburgh

With a population of 302,407 individuals, Pittsburgh is the second most populated city in Pennsylvania. It is the county seat of Allegheny County. It is the country’s 63rd biggest city in terms of population. Pittsburgh is located at the confluence of three rivers, the Ohio, Allegheny, and Monongahela rivers. The city is nicknamed as the “Steel City” by virtue of its over 300 steel-related businesses. It is also called the "City of Bridges” as there 446 bridges in the city. Pittsburgh also has a thriving manufacturing sector and has the most stockholders per capita in the country. A large number of technology firms like Facebook, Google, Nokia, Apple Inc., Uber, etc., have their offices in this city. Many prestigious educational and research institutions are also based in Pittsburgh.

3. Allentown

Pennsylvania’s third biggest city, Allentown, is home to a population of around 121,283 people. It is the country’s 231st largest city. It is located on the Lehigh River and serves as the county seat of Lehigh County. Allentown was founded in 1762.

4. Erie

As the name suggests, Erie is located on the south shore of Lake Erie. It is Pennsylvania’s fourth most populated city and houses 97,369 individuals. Erie is the county seat of Erie County. The city has a diverse economy. Manufacturing, healthcare, higher education, tourism, other service industries, and technology are the biggest sectors of Erie’s economy.

5. Reading

The city of Reading is the fifth largest city in the state. It has a population of 88,423 individuals. Reading serves as the seat of Berks County. Reading is nicknamed "The Pretzel City” because of the large number of local pretzel bakeries located in the city. Cycling in and around Reading is a major attraction for tourists and professional cyclists.

The Capital of Pennsylvania

Harrisburg, the capital city of Pennsylvania, is not its largest city but its 10th largest city. It is home to a population of 49,192 individuals. Harrisburg also serves as the county seat of Dauphin County.

The 10 Biggest Cities In Pennsylvania

Rank City County 2012  pop. est. Area (mi2) Pop. dens. (p/mi2)

1 Philadelphia Philadelphia
15,47,607142.710,844.6
2 Pittsburgh Allegheny 3,06,21158.35,248.9
3 Allentown Lehigh 1,18,97418.06,600.9
4 Erie Erie 1,01,04719.35,241.3
5 Reading Berks 88,10210.18,689.4
6 Upper Darby Delaware 82,7797.810,578.8
7 Scranton Lackawanna 75,80925.52,968.5
8 Bethlehem Northampton/Lehigh 75,10319.53,861.1
9 Bensalem Bucks 60,49720.92,890.4
10 Lancaster Lancaster 59,3607.48,071.8

•By Oishimaya Sen Nag

•culled from www.worldatlas.com


Monday, 20 April 2020

John Thomsen, “The Golden Voice of the Boise Basin”

John Thomsen
Nestled up in a crook near Idaho City, folk musician John Thomsen and his wife, Linda, live in a colorful, amazing and eclectic house he built himself and christened “Loafers Glory.”

It’s a honey of a home; inside there are ornately carved walls and cabinets holding various forms of memorabilia. Outside, it’s surrounded by a seemingly magical garden complete with an array of flowering plants, whimsical statues and brightly-painted traveling wagons.

Thomsen turned 80 in August and Linda threw him a huge bash — more than 80 attended.

And that’s because Thomsen is a pretty cool guy who has a really great voice. Dave Daley, who played with Thomsen in the Mores Creek String Band, calls him “the golden voice of the Boise basin.”

To commemorate his 80th year, Limberlost Press, a local publisher that focuses on local and regional artists, has also released Thomsen’s first CD —“John Thomsen and Friends: Songs from Loafer’s Glory.”

An American tradition

Folk music has always been the music for the people, but perhaps more importantly, folk music tells the stories of the people. Thomsen said the stories are the most interesting to him.

“Folk music, to me, is a legacy in and of itself,” he said. “The songs tell stories about how people lived. People are using folk music to interpret life,” he said.

Thomsen said when he was young, everyone sang all the time. “It’s just something I did, it’s something everyone did,” he said.

And while the popularity of folk music has waxed and waned, shifted according to the times, it has never disappeared. Rick Ardinger, editor of Limberlost Press, remembers what local folksinging legend Rosalie Sorrels, who was a longtime friend of Thomsen’s, always said: “Folk music comes back when people need it.”

John Thomsen
The artist’s story

Most of the songs Thomsen knows, aren’t written down, they are in his head. “When we first got together I had a cowboy song book and he knew all of them ... he knows so many songs,” said Linda. Indeed, Thomsen seems to be a veritable catalog of folk music. Maybe that has a little bit to do with the way he grew up.

Thomsen was raised in Minnesota with his six brothers and sisters. They didn’t have electricity until he was 10, he said, and he taught himself to play guitar using a book of old folk songs. His first guitar was old and didn’t have a proper bridge — there was a matchbook in its place.

He would listen to “The Grand Ole Opry” on the radio at night, turning it down low when his father told him to go to bed. Then, waking “at the crack of dawn” to do chores, he would sing the songs he’d heard the night before all day long.

Once you start learning music, “you get a little obsessed,” Thomsen said. It paid off but being a musician was never Thomsen’s full-time gig. He was busy in the Navy and was also a master wood carver. But Thomsen can play over seven instruments, has played with or around some of the most respected folk musicians in Idaho and even wrote his own parody song to the classic tune of “Tennessee Stud.”

“The Idaho Spud”

Thomsen never considered himself a songwriter, he preferred to sing and play, but he always thought he could write a parody. The old folk tune “Tennessee Stud” was written by Jimmy Driftwood and released in 1959. It was one of Driftwood’s most famous songs and was covered by Johnny Cash, Hank Williams, Jr., and, more recently, by The Meat Puppets.

But the popularity of the song isn’t why Thomsen chose that melody for his parody. “People would ask me to sing ‘Tennessee Stud,’ and, well ... I never learned the words to it,” he said with a laugh.

Thomsen’s version is a satirical protest song that imagines contaminated water from the Idaho National Laboratory leaching into a potato field causing disastrous results for both the potatoes and the children that consume them. The song ends with the verse, “I got a cute little mutant on the cabin floor. Another half a kid to stop the door. They light right up like green tomaters — Cuzz I’m feedin’ them youngsters on nuclear taters.” It’s a toe-tapping song with an edge, and the quick-witted lyrics couple smoothly with Thomsen’s “golden voice.”

And if that doesn’t “mash your potatoes” — the CD is full of other folk-music classics, and comes with a booklet of photos and tributes by admirers.

•By Tracy Bringhurst

•culled from www.idahopress.com



Sunday, 19 April 2020

What Is the Capital of Oregon?

The state flag of Oregon. 
The capital city of Oregon is Salem.

The state of Oregon is located in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States. Salem is the state capital, and the county headquarters of Marion County. Salem was founded in 1842, has an elevation of 154 feet above sea level, and is estimated to be 48.45 square miles in size, 98% of which is land, and the remaining 2% is water. The City of Salem has an estimated population of 167,419 and a population density of about 3,228 per square mile. The city has also been nicknamed Cherry City due to its robust cherry industry since 1847.

History

Salem was originally inhabited by the Kalapuya, a Native American tribe. The Kalapuya people occupied present day Salem until the 1850s, when they were moved to the Grande Ronde Reservation in the western part of Salem. By this time, the tribe had become nearly extinct from recurrent attacks by diseases that weakened their immune system. European-Americans settled in Salem in 1812 and made a living as trappers and gatherers of food for the fur trade companies. An American settlement was permanently established in the area with the arrival of Methodist Missionaries in the 1840s, who set up the Oregon Institute.

Demographics

Salem's population is predominantly Caucasian. About 79% of the population is Caucasian, while about 20% is Hispanic. There is the little presence of other races. The population of Salem is also highly educated, with about 87% of the population having high school education and above. Salem's population is relatively young, with a median age of 35 years.

Economy

The main economic sectors in Salem are the service, agriculture, and manufacturing industries. As state capital and county headquarters, most people are employed in the public sector and provide administrative services. Salem Hospital is the largest private employer in the county. Agricultural food processing in Salem is abundant, include Kettle Foods and NORPAC Foods. The manufacturing sector is also vibrant, and there are many metal fabrication and high-tech manufacturing industries. Hospitality, professional and business services, natural resources and mining are other economic sectors in Salem.

Cuisine

Salem has restaurants that specialize in a variety of cuisines, including Chinese, Mexican, Italian, American, and Japanese. Some famous restaurants include Amadeus, Annette's Westgate, Bently's Grill, Best Little Roadhouse, Christo's Pizzeria and Lounge, Marco Polo Global Restaurant and Robert's Crossing. A one night accommodation in a 3-star hotel costs an average of $220 in Salem.

Notable Sites

There are several places one can visit in Salem. A few popular sites and landmarks include Salem's Riverfront Carousel, Oregon State Capitol, Willamette University, and the Willamette Valley Fruit Company. There are also parks such as Schreiner's Iris Garden, Minto-Brown Island Park, Riverfront Park, and much more. Salem has popular museums and historic sites such as the Deepwood Museums and Gardens, Gilbert House Children's Museum, and the Oregon State Hospital Museums.

Climate

Summers in Salem are warm and dry, and begin at the end of June and end in mid September, with average temperatures of approximately 77°F. Winter begins in mid November and lasts until late February. Salem has rainfall for 11 months of the year, from August until June. However, annual snowfall in Salem is only 6 inches.

•By Benjamin Elisha Sawe

•culled from www.worldatlas.com


Top Cities In Oregon

The US State of Oregon has a varied climate,
scenic beauty, great cities, and rich culture.
Naturally rich in spectacular landscapes and having mild climates, many cities in the US state of Oregon provide idyllic living spaces for their residents.

The US State Of Oregon

Oregon is a Pacific northwestern state in the United States (US), located between Washington and California. The state consists of 8 geographic areas including coastlines, valleys, mountains, and high altitude deserts. Various climates occur throughout the state due to its varied geography. The climate patterns prevalent across the state includes oceanic, Mediterranean, steppe, and subarctic. The Pacific Ocean heavily influences the weather along the coast, creating mild and wet winters. The population size is 4,028,977 and comprised of various ethnicities: white (83.6%), Asian (3.7%), Black (1.8%), and Native (1.4%). Residents here have an average income of $39,848, and the unemployment rate is 6.7% (1.1% higher than the national average). The population is concentrated in urban areas, some of which are discussed below.

Most Populated Cities

The most populated cities are located in the Willamette Valley and include Portland (632.309), Salem (164,549), Eugene (163,460), Gresham (110,553), Hillsboro (102,347), and Beaverton (96,577). For people living here, supermarkets, restaurants, public transportation, and libraries are easy to access. Additionally, the crime rate is 68% lower than in the rest of the state. These perks do come with their downfall, however, the cost of living is 18% higher than the state average.

Lake Oswego

The second top city in Oregon is Lake Oswego (population 38,496) which also scored 82. This town is high in amenities and enjoys low crime rates, though not as low as that in West Linn. Here, the crime rate is 55% lower than the rest of the state. In addition, this town has a high school graduation rate that is 14% higher than the Oregon average and test scores that are 34% higher than the national average. Like West Linn, however, the cost of living in Lake Oswego is significantly higher than the rest of Oregon (28% more to be exact). This cost of living places it at number 2.

Durham

Ranking third among the top cities in Oregon is Durham, a small town of 1,327 people located south of Portland in the Willamette Valley. This town also received a livability score of 82 due to varied conveniences located nearby and a crime rate that is 85% lower than the rest of the state! Unfortunately, its education rating brought its rank down to number 3. Although the high school graduation rate is 7% higher than the Oregon average, less than half of the population holds a Bachelor’s degree.

Portland

Portland became a popular destination for settlers in the mid-1800’s due to its location at the end of the historic Oregon Trail. Its location on the Columbia River offers easy access to the Pacific Ocean which promoted trade and the logging industry. In the 1950’s, this city developed a reputation for organized crime and in the 60’s became a center for liberal political ideologies. Although the organized crime rates reduced, crime overall has not. According to the 2009 FBI Uniform Crime Report, Portland ranks 53rd in violent crimes. These crimes include aggravated assault, homicide, rape, and robbery. Although Portland continues to be the most populated urban area in the state, its crime rate prevents it from being listed on the list of Top 50 Best Places to Live in Oregon. Below is a look at some of the top cities in Oregon.

Top Places to Live in Oregon

Top cities in Oregon have been ranked by AreaVibes according to a livability scale which includes such factors as amenities, the cost of living, crime, education, employment, housing, and weather. Although these cities do not make it to our list of most populated cities in Oregon, they are definitely famous for their high living standards.

West Linn

According to this scale, West Linn (population 26,593) is the best place to live in Oregon. This city received a livability score of 82 against a national average of 60. West Linn scored particularly high in local amenities and low crime rates.

These are just the top three places to live in the state. Choosing a city to live in is a long process and requires considering many factors. For a look at Oregon’s urban areas in order of population, there is a table published below.

Top Cities In Oregon

Rank City Population (2015 est.) County

1 Portland 632,309 Multnomah, Washington, Clackamas
2 Salem 164,549 Marion, Polk
3 Eugene 163,460 Lane
4 Gresham 110,553 Multnomah
5 Hillsboro 102,347 Washington
6 Beaverton 96,577 Washington
7 Bend 87,014 Deschutes
8 Medford 79,805 Jackson
9 Springfield 60,870 Lane
10 Corvallis 55,780 Benton
11 Albany 52,175 Linn, Benton
12 Tigard 51,253 Washington
13 Lake Oswego 38,496 Clackamas, Multnomah, Washington
14 Keizer 37,895 Marion
15 Grants Pass 37,088 Josephine
16 Oregon City 35,831 Clackamas
17 McMinnville 33,892 Yamhill
18 Redmond 28,654 Deschutes
19 Tualatin 27,154 Washington, Clackamas
20 West Linn 26,593 Clackamas

•By Amber Pariona

•culled from www.worldatlas.com


Music of Hawaii

Ukulele player. © Google
From Traditional to Contemporary

The roots of Hawaiian music go back a thousand years and you can still hear echoes in today’s rhythms, percussion instruments, chants, and vocal styles. Traditional music is generally simple in its structure and both reverent and haunting in the way that it’s presented. Some of these qualities stem from the influence of early missionaries' hymns, which significantly influenced the direction of traditional Hawaiian music in the 19th century. But, today it’s also possible to hear variations of Hawaiian music that are as diverse as the islands’ mix of cultures – everything from rock ‘n roll and rap to jazz and a Hawaiian form of reggae known as Jawaiian.

Music Festivals

Every year, Hawaiian music is celebrated in music festivals that celebrate the uniqueness of Hawaii instruments, musicians, and songs. The Ukulele Festival (July) at Kapiolani Park Bandstand in Waikiki honors what many visitors believe to be a hand-me-down from ancient Hawaii, but in reality, the ukulele was brought here by Portuguese immigrants at the end of the 19th century. Today, the ukulele is still a fundamental part of the musical landscape, not simply on stage but also at family picnics or on the beach.

The island of Hawaii's Kona Slack Key Festival (September) pays tribute to a uniquely local way of playing the guitar – another Hawaiian music staple. Slack key is a “slacked” or loosened tuning or technique that reflects the breezy, flowing quality of both local climate and culture.

•culled from www.gohawaii.com

Saturday, 18 April 2020

What Is the Capital of Oklahoma?

Oklahoma City, the capital of Oklahoma.
The capital city of Oklahoma is Oklahoma City.

Oklahoma is the 20th largest and 28th most populous state in the US. It joined the Union on November 16, 1907, as the 46th state of the United States. Its people are known as Oklahomans or Okies. Oklahoma is a major producer of agricultural products, oil, and natural gas. In 2007 Oklahoma was ranked among the fastest growing economies in the US and one of the states with the highest per capita income. Oklahoma City is the capital of Oklahoma State and the county seat of Oklahoma County.


Overview of Oklahoma City

Oklahoma City is the largest and capital city of the state of Oklahoma. It is the 27th largest city in the US with an estimated population of about 650,000. The Oklahoma City metropolitan area boast of a population of about 1.4 million people. Oklahoma City has grown to be one of the state’s most formidable aviation centers; it is home to Tinker Air Force Base, Mike Monroney Aeronautical Center, and the Federal Aviation Administration. In 1995 the city became a victim of one of the deadliest terror attacks in American history when a truck bomb was detonated in the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building killing 168 people while injuring about 500 others.

The Economy

The economy of Oklahoma largely depends on agriculture, petroleum products, manufacture of automobiles, tires, and electronic and computer equipment. The service sector especially the state and federal governments play a great role, health care, education, customer service and tourism are also important. It acts as a distribution center for food and agricultural products including dairy products and wheat. Several multi nation organizations are located within the town including the Devon Energy and Chesapeake Energy, Love's Travel Stops & Country Stores which is ranked among Forbes list of large private companies is also located in the town.

Climate

The city of Oklahoma experiences a humid subtropical climate characterized by frequent variations in weather except during the hot and humid summer months. During the summer Oklahoma experiences severe droughts caused by winds blowing from south or south-southeast and leads to the migration of wild animals to human settlements, however when the skies open up the city experiences flash flooding. During the winter the city experiences snow and ice storms. The annual average precipitation is about 35.9 inches of which snow account for about 8.6 inches.

Government and Politics

The City of Oklahoma is managed by a council-manager system of governance since 1927. The council consists of eight members who are. The council consists of eight members each representing a particular ward and the mayor. Mick Cornett was first elected the mayor of the city in 2004 before he was reelected in 2006, 2010, and 2014. The city is among the most politically conservative cities in the US and has always advocated for its residents to vote for sales tax-based projects to develop parts of the city. The Bricktown district is one of the initiatives developed by the sales tax increase. Recently a $777 million public dubbed the Metropolitan Area Projects Plan 3 (MAPS 3) was set to be funded by a voter-approved sales tax increase.

•By Victor Kiprop

•culled from www.worldatlas.com


The 10 Biggest Cities In Oklahoma

Oklahoma City is the most populated city in Oklahoma.

The US state of Oklahoma is located in the southern region of the country. It is home to 3,751,616 inhabitants that makes it the country’s 28th most populous state. With an area of 177,660.0 square km, Oklahoma is America’s 19th most expansive state. Oklahoma has 77 counties with 597 incorporated municipalities including towns and cities. All incorporated municipalities with a population of 1,000 and above are called cities. The most populous city in Oklahoma is Oklahoma City, followed by Tulsa, Norman, Broken Arrow, and Lawton among others.

Largest Cities in Oklahoma

1. Oklahoma City

With a population of 579,999 individuals, Oklahoma City is Oklahoma’s largest city. It is also the state capital and the county seat of Oklahoma County. It is the country’s 27th most populous city. Although most of the city is located in the Oklahoma County, its limits also extend into Cleveland, Pottawatomie, and Canadian counties. Oklahoma City is the country’s second biggest city in terms of area which is 1,606.67 square km. The city has one of the largest livestock markets in the world. Also, petroleum and natural gas industry are well established here. The federal and state governments also employ many people.

2. Tulsa

Oklahoma’s second most populated city is Tulsa. It has a population of 391,906 individuals. It is the country’s 47th biggest city by population. Tulsa is the county seat of Tulsa County, the state’s most densely populated county. Settlement in the region began in the early 19th century. In the 20th century, Tulsa was nicknamed the "Oil Capital of the World” as it was one of America’s biggest hubs for the oil industry. Today, however, the city’s economy has diversified significantly.

3. Norman

The US city of Norman is Oklahoma’s third largest city. It has 110,925 residents. It serves as the county seat of Cleveland County. The University of Oklahoma, the state’s largest university, is located here. Other higher learning and research institutions are also present in Norman. The University of Oklahoma has several museums including a natural history museum and an art museum.

4. Broken Arrow

Broken Arrow is located in the Tulsa County of Oklahoma. A small section of the city extends into Wagoner County. With a population of 98,850, it is the state’s fourth largest city. Although Broken Arrow was primarily an agricultural community in the past, today it has a diverse economy.

5. Lawton

Lawton, the fifth most populated state in Oklahoma, has a population of 96,867 people. It is the county seat of Comanche County. The city was established in 1901. It mostly has flat topography with gently rolling hills. The Fort Sill Military Reservation forms the backbone of Lawton’s economy. Other important economic sectors in the city include higher education, health care, retail, and manufacturing.

The Economy of Oklahoma

Oklahoma has a diverse economy. The state hosts a variety of sectors like energy, aviation, electronics, food processing, etc. It is the country’s third largest natural gas producer. It ranks 5th in wheat production in the US. Oklahoma is regarded as one of the nation’s most business-friendly states.

The 10 Biggest Cities In Oklahoma

Rank City Population County

1 Oklahoma City 5,79,999 Oklahoma
2 Tulsa 3,91,906 Tulsa
3 Norman 1,10,925 Cleveland
4 Broken Arrow 98,850 Tulsa
5 Lawton 96,867 Comanche
6 Edmond 81,405 Oklahoma
7 Moore 55,081 Cleveland
8 Midwest City 54,371 Oklahoma
9 Enid 49,379 Garfield
10 Stillwater 45,688 Payne

•By Oishimaya Sen Nag

•culled from www.worldatlas.com


Friday, 17 April 2020

Georgian Folk Music And Dances

Georgian folk musician. © Shutterstock
Georgian polyphonic singing

The key to appreciating Georgian culture lies in its musical folklore. Georgian polyphony and national dances express the beauty of Georgian nature, national temperament, everyday life and traditional alues.

The most popular forms of singing are church and folk polyphony. Three voices flow in perfect harmony, resembling Holy Trinity. They don’t have the main voice as in European musical culture. The singers are usually men, where typical Georgian song consists of three male voices. Polyphony is an integral part of Georgian social life. Georgian have been singing while celebrating some events or working. One of the most popular polyphonic songs is Mravalzhamieri, ritual song at weddings and New Year.

Just an important message. In 1997, NASA sent a Voyager 2 to space with a golden disc of 25 best melodies from around the world. Chakrulo, a classic, old, polyphonic Georgian folk song, is among them.   It is also included in the UNESCO list of World Heritage.


Georgian National Dances

For Georgians dancing is not only part of their culture, but the life itself. It perfectly expresses a traditional attitude of men to women, their role in society, as well as incorporates various forms of rituals and ceremonies.

Male dancers need a lot of energy, delicate techniques and stamina. Only in Georgian dances a man moves on his tiptoes without any special shoes. He is the leader both on the stage and in everyday life. A woman is reserved and humble. She tries not to be very open, but there is something mysterious, charming and enigmatic about her, which attracts her male partner. However, the latter still keeps distance.

“Kartuli” represents one of the most popular and elegant dances in Georgian choreography. This classic dance is often performed by a groom and a bride at the wedding ceremony. It reflects national grandeur of a Georgian woman and devotion, respect and love from her male partner.

Regional differences are clearly visible in clothes, as well as in plastics. Dances from mountains and Black Sea coast are vigorous. “Acharuli”is a very colorful and delicate dance from Black Sea coast of Achara.

Georgian choreography is full of warrior dances, which reflect historic drama of the nation where men had to defend their land against invaders throughout their history. “Khorumi” is a classic dance, telling the story of a small group of soldiers, symbolically showing the strength of unity.

“Samaia” (Trinity) is a beautiful and graceful dance performed by women. It was danced in honor of Queen Tamar, a wise monarch in 12-13th centuries. She incorporated in her three images – a beautiful woman, wise mother and clever monarch.

•Culled from www.meetingeorgia.ge

Wednesday, 15 April 2020

What Is the Capital of Ohio?

The state flag of Ohio.
The capital city of Ohio is Columbus.

Columbus is Ohio's state capital and the seat of Franklin County. It is Ohio’s largest city and the 14th biggest city in the United States. In 2016, Columbus was inhabited by 860,090 people, making it the nation's third most-populated state capital. Columbus ranks behind Chicago as the second biggest city in the mid-western region of the United States. Columbus was named by Money in 2016 as one of "The 6 Best Big Cities," based on its impressive growth in wages and a highly educated workforce.

History of the Capital of Ohio

Columbus was historically included in Ohio Country, which was a French colony from 1663 until 1763. Europeans frequented the area in the 18th century to engage in the fur trade. The region was the site of many battles in which the French, Native Americans, and Europeans sought to protect their interests. The Treaty of Paris (1763) allocated the territory to the British territory.

Ohio was included in the Virginia Military District after the American Revolution. However, rather than unoccupied land, colonialists discovered the Shawnee, Miami, Mingo, Wyandot, and Delaware nations, as well as European traders. The tribes engaged the colonialists in conflicts, and it was not until the signing of the Treaty of Greenville that new settlements sprang up. The first settlement was named Franklinton, and Columbus was built opposite this village. Columbus received its city charter on March 3, 1834, and eventually annexed Franklinton in 1837.

Geography of Columbus

The northwest region of Downtown Columbus is situated at the confluence of the Olentangy and Scioto Rivers. Some tributaries cut through the city's metropolitan area including Darby Creek, Alum Creek, and the Big Walnut Creek. Although the city is noted as having a relatively flat topography, there are notable differences in elevation across the region. The landscape of Columbus includes multiple ravines close to the creeks and rivers. The tributaries of the Olentangy River and Alum Creek cut through shale, while those to the Scioto River flow through limestone. Columbus occupies an area of 223.11 square miles, of which 5.94 square miles is water, and 217.12 square miles is land.

Demographics of Columbus

93.4% of the city's population in 1900 was white. In the recent years, the Columbus metropolitan area has accommodated increasing communities of Latin-Americans, Africans, and Asians, Mexicans, Somalis, Puerto Ricans, and Indians. As of 2004, Columbus had the country's second largest Somali-American and Somali community. The international student society of the Ohio State University further expands the city's diversity. in 2010, 61.5% of the inhabitants of Columbus were Caucasian and 28% identified as either African American or Black.

Economy of Columbus

The capital city of Ohio boasts of a diverse and robust economy with sectors such as education, steel, health care, fashion, retail, insurance, logistics, food, medical research, aviation, and technology. The city's metropolitan area recorded a GDP of $94.7 billion in 2010, which was an improvement from the $90 billion in 2009 and $85.5 billion in 2006. The city was able to cushion itself from the recession, which commenced in late 2007 because of decades of diversification activities implemented by business and political leaders and longtime corporate inhabitants. There are plenty of government jobs in municipal, county, federal and state offices. Companies based in Columbus include Big Los, American Electric Power, Chemical Abstracts Service, and Donatos Pizza.

Government of Columbus

Columbus is governed by a mayor, in addition to a unicameral council of seven members. Among the officers elected by the people are city attorney, auditor, and municipal court judges. The mayor chooses the director of public service, in addition to the director of safety.

•By Benjamin Elisha Sawe

•culled from www.worldatlas.com

Biggest Cities In Ohio

The night skyline of Columbus, Ohio, US
Columbus, the biggest city in Ohio, has a diverse economy based on education, banking, fashion, health care, food processing, and manufacturing.

Ohio is in the Great Lakes Region of the US. The state is the 7th most populous state in the country with a population of about 11,613,423. Columbus is the biggest city in Ohio as well as the state capital. Ohio is in between the Northeast and the Midwest, a strategic location that has helped it grow economically and expand.

Manufacturing and financial institutions are the biggest contributors to Ohio’s economy. The state has the largest bioscience economy in the Midwest, and it leads the nation in the green economy.

The Largest Cities in Ohio

1. Columbus - 860,090

Columbus is the largest city in Ohio and has a diverse economy based on education, banking, fashion, health care, food, defense, hospitality, technology and medical research. The city experiences a humid continental transitioning with the humid subtropical climate. The south has hot, wet summers and cold, dry winters. The state is prone to severe weather conditions typical of the Midwest like severe thunderstorms with lightning, large hail, and occasional tornadoes.

2. Cleveland - 388,072

Cleveland City is located on the southern shore of Lake Erie in northern Ohio. Manufacturing, healthcare, financial services, and biomedical facilities are the backbone of Cleveland’s economy. The city is home to world-class industries like Applied Industrial Technologies, NACCO Industries, Cliffs Natural Resources and KeyCorp. NASA maintains a facility in Cleveland; the Glenn Research Centre.

3. Cincinnati - 298,800

Cincinnati is the third largest city in Ohio. Cincinnati benefits from a low rate of unemployment and a low cost of living compared to other parts of the United States. A number of large global companies are headquartered in Cincinnati, including Procter & Gable, Kroger, and Macy's.

4. Toledo - 279,789

Toledo is Ohio's fourth largest city. It is found in northwest Ohio, near the border with Michigan. Ohio, which has a long history connecting to glass production, has sometimes been called the "glass city".

5. Akron - 197,542

Akron is the fifth largest city in Ohio. It is found in the northeastern portion of the state, not far from the Pennsylvania border. Akron is best known for its historically important role in the rubber industry in the USA.

Biggest Cities In Ohio

Rank City Population

1 Columbus 860,090
2 Cleveland 388,072
3 Cincinnati 298,800
4 Toledo 279,789
5 Akron 197,542
6 Dayton 140,599
7 Parma 81,601
8 Cantonb 72,683
9 Youngstown 65,184
10 Lorain 64,097
11 Hamilton 62,477
12 Springfield 60,608
13 Kettering 56,163
14 Elyria 54,533
15 Lakewood 52,131
16 Cuyahoga Falls 49,652
17 Euclid 48,92
18 Middletown 48,694
19 Mansfield 47,821
20 Newark 47,573

•By Benjamin Elisha Sawe

•culled from www.worldatlas.com

Monday, 13 April 2020

What Is the Capital of Tennessee?

The skyline of Nashville, Tennessee.
The capital city of Tennessee is Nashville.

Nashville is the capital city of the state of Tennessee. It is popularly known for its music and it has a legendary music house known as the Grand Ole Opry House. Nashville has continued to advance in technology to become the urban centre it is today.

History Of The Capital City Of Tennessee

Before Nashville became the capital of Tennessee, there were two other cities battling it for the position. The two cities were Knoxville and Murfreesboro. On February 6th, 1796 the constitutional convention declared Knoxville as the capital. However, in 1812 through to 1816 Nashville was back as the capital. In 1817 Knoxville was back as the capital once again. In 1818-1826 Murfreesboro was now declared as the capital. A second constitutional convention held in 1826 that put Nashville back as its capital. At 1843 Nashville and Murfreesboro battled again to be the capital of Tennessee. The democrats supported Murfreesboro while the Whigs supported Nashville. Nashville however won as it had better roads and better water connections. The legislature also argued that since the state prison was in Nashville it was suitable to be the state capital as they needed to watch over the prison. Therefore, from 1826 Nashville became the state capital of Tennessee. Nashville has further grown to become the modern urban centre.

Geography Of The Capital Of Tennessee

Nashville is located in middle of the state of Tennessee on the Cumberland valley. It is approximately 526 square miles, and 504 square miles consists of land mass while 22 square miles consist of its water mass. The city has an elevation of 550 feet above sea level. It is the second city in the US to have a land mass of more than 500 square miles.

Population Of Nashville

The population of the capital city of Tennessee is 684,410 which is made up of a highly diverse population. The population consists of white Americans who make 66.99% of the total population, black Americans make up 25.92% of the population, Native Americans 2.23%, Asians 0.07%, and the other races make of the remaining 4.4%.

Economy Of Nashville

Nashville is known for its great music and for producing highly talented musicians such as Johny Cash. This is how it has earned its nickname of music city. The Music Industry contributes about $9.65billion of the economy annually. Nashville is also known for its healthcare companies such as the public traded HCA and community health systems that contribute one billion dollars to the economy. The tourism industry also plays a large part in contributing to Nashville's economy. Having the music convention centre and the music hall of fame, many people are attracted to visiting Nashville to have glimpse of the beauty the city has to offer.

Governance Of The Capital Of Tennessee

Nashville is headed by a mayor who is elected by the people of Nashville. The mayor is only supposed to hold office for a maximum term of eight years. Although there have been attempts to lengthen the period the mayor can be in office, but none of the candidates have been able to collect enough valid signatures to put in the ballot in order for the ruling terms to be amended.

•By Joseph Kiprop

•culled from www.worldatlas.com


Sunday, 12 April 2020

The 10 Biggest Cities In Tennessee

Memphis, the second largest city in Tennessee.
Nashville is the capital and largest city in the US state of Tennessee.

State of Tennessee

Tennessee is a US state located in the country’s southeastern region. It encompasses an area of 109,247 square km, making it the country’s 36th most extensive state. With a population of approximately 6,715,984, it is the 16th most populous US state. Tennessee is subdivided into 95 counties and contains 346 municipalities, which are designated as cities or towns. Just over 56% of the state’s population resides in these municipalities.

The Five Most Populated Cities in Tennessee

1. Nashville

Nashville is the most populous city in Tennessee and the 24th largest in the the country. The city, which is also the state capital, had an estimated population of 667,560 in 2017. It is located along the Cumberland River and serves as the county seat of Davidson County. The city was founded in 1779 and named after Francis Nash, a general of the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War. Today, Nashville is a hub for music, publishing, healthcare, transportation, banking, and education within the state. Several institutions of higher education, including Tennessee State University, Vanderbilt University, and Belmont University, are located in Nashville.

2. Memphis

With a population of 652,236, Memphis is the second most populous city in Tennessee, and ranks as the 25th largest in the country. Memphis is located along the Mississippi River, in the southwestern part of Shelby County, where it serves as the county seat. Historically, the city played a significant role in the American civil rights movement. For example, the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr occurred in Memphis in 1968. Today, the city is a center for education, art, entertainment, commerce, and media. FedEx is the largest employer in the city, and the Memphis International Airport is the world’s second busiest cargo airport. Memphis barbecue has become world renowned, and the city hosts an annual World Championship Barbecue Cooking Contest, which is the largest pork barbecue contest in the world and attracts thousands of visitors.

3. Knoxville

Knoxville has a population of 186,239 and is Tennessee’s third largest city. It also serves as the county seat of Knox County. The city, which was first settled in 1786, was the state’s first capital. Knoxville is one of the gateways to the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. The headquarters of several regional and national corporate companies are located within the city. Knoxville is also home to the main campus of the University of Tennessee.

4. Chattanooga

Chattanooga is the fourth most populous city of Tennessee, with a population of 177,571. The city is located in Hamilton County, within southeastern Tennessee, and is situated along the Tennessee River. Chattanooga is a transit hub and is served by numerous highways and railroads. Surrounded by ridges and mountains, the city offers a number of outdoor activities to residents and visitors. In fact, the Chattanooga has been nicknamed "Scenic City." American bandleader and composer Glenn Miller’s song "Chattanooga Choo Choo" has made the city known around the world.

5. Clarksville

With a population of approximately 150,287, Clarksville is Tennessee’s fifth biggest city. It also serves as the county seat of Montgomery County. Clarksville was established in 1785 and later incorporated in 1807. Austin Peay State University is based in Clarksville.

Legal Requirements to Be a Tennessee Municipality

Although some municipalities in the state are referred to as "cities" while others are called "towns," the terms do not have any legal significance in the state. Municipalities with at least 1,500 residents are required to incorporate, either under the city manager-commission or the mayor-alderman charters. At least 5,000 residents are needed for a city to form under a modified city manager-council charter.

The 10 Biggest Cities in Tennessee by Population

Rank City County Population

1 Nashville Davidson 667,560
2 Memphis Shelby 652,236
3 Knoxville Knox 186,239
4 Chattanooga Hamilton 177,571
5 Clarksville Montgomery 150,287
6 Murfreesboro Rutherford 131,947
7 Franklin Williamson 74,794
8 Jackson Madison 67,005
9 Johnson City Washington 66,677
10 Bartlett Shelby 58,622

•By Oishimaya Sen Nag

•culled from www.worldatlas.com




Friday, 10 April 2020

What Is the Capital of North Dakota?

The state flag of North Dakota.
The capital city of North Dakota is Bismarck.

Bismarck is North Dakota's state capital. Bismarck ranks second among North Dakota's cities behind Fargo in terms of population. The 2016 population was approximately 72,417 with a metropolitan population of 131,635.

When Did Bismarck Become the Capital?

Bismarck was originally occupied by the Mandan Native American community, who spoke the Hidatsa language. European Americans established a settlement in what was then the Missouri Crossing in 1872, which was later called Edwinton, in honor of Edwin Ferry Johnson, the engineer-in-chief contracted by the Northern Pacific Railway. The company's railroad developments attracted settlers and workers, and the company named the growing city Bismarck in 1872, after Otto von Bismarck, the chancellor of Germany. The name was intended to attract German investment and settlers. Gold deposits in the Black Hills of South Dakota triggered the immigration of thousands of miners to the city. Bismarck was recognized as the capital of Dakota Territory in 1883, and in 1889 it became the capital of the newly incorporated state of North Dakota.

Demographics of Bismarck

The 2010 census reported 61,272 people in the city of Bismarck, which included 27,263 households, and a total of 15,624 families. The population density was 1,986.1 people per square mile. 92.4% of Bismarck's population was Caucasian, 0.7% was African-American, and Native Americans and Asians made up 0.6% and 0.3% of the population, respectively. 1.3% of the residents identified as either Latino or Hispanic of no particular race. Bismarck's median age was 38 years, while the gender makeup was 51.4% female and 48.6 male. The city's average family size was reported to be 2.82, and the average household size was 2.18.

Economy of Bismarck

The health sector is a major employer in the capital city of Bismarck. Sanford Health has 25,000 employees in the company, while St. Alexius Medical Center employs 2,264 individuals. The state of North Dakota employs about 4,400 workers, and 1,200 individuals work for the federal government. Other top employers are the public schools, Wal-Mart, the City of Bismarck, Coventry Health Care, MDU Resources, and Aetna.

Government of Bismarck

Bismarck is governed by the city commission type of municipal government. Citizens choose five at-large city commissioners who must receive the majority of electorate votes. This scenario makes it difficult for minorities and other interest groups to propel the candidates they prefer to victory. The city's mayoral position is occupied by the city commission's president. The city commission convenes on the second and fourth Tuesday of every month. Bismarck is home to North Dakota's state capitol building, which houses the legislative and judicial divisions of the state, in addition to multiple government agencies.

Transportation in Bismarck

Bismarck has a public bus system which commenced operations in May 2004. The system maintains eleven routes across Bismarck and Mandan. The Bismarck Municipal Airport lies south of the city, and is served by airlines such as Delta Air Lines, Frontier Airlines, and United Express. The airport handles the second highest passenger volume in North Dakota and the highest in western North Dakota. The city is further served by the BNSF Railway and two federal highways.

•By Benjamin Elisha Sawe

•culled from www.worldatlas.com


Thursday, 9 April 2020

The 10 Biggest Cities In North Dakota

Downtown Fargo in North Dakota. 
Fargo is the most populous city in the US state of North Dakota.

The US state of North Dakota is one of the most sparsely populated states in the country. It is located in the Great Plains region and is the fourth smallest state by population. According to 2017 estimates, North Dakota had a population 755,393. However, the state is relatively large in size. North Dakota occupies an area of 183,843 square km, making it the country’s 19th most extensive state. The state has no towns, villages, or hamlets. Instead, all incorporated municipalities are classified as cities. Fargo is the largest city by population, followed by Bismarck, Grand Forks, Minot, and West Fargo.

Most Populous Cities in North Dakota

1. Fargo

With a population of 105,549, Fargo is the most populated city in North Dakota and ranks as the 225th most populous in the country. It is the county seat of Cass County. The population of Fargo accounts for nearly 17% of the state’s population. Local on the Red River, the city was established in 1871 and serves as the cultural, industrial, educational, retail, and health care center of eastern North Dakota. Fargo is also the home of North Dakota State University.

2. Bismarck

Bismarck is the second most populous city in North Dakota, with a population of approximately 61,272. It serves as the state capital and the county seat of Burleigh County. Located on the eastern bank of the Missouri River, the city was established in 1872 and has served as North Dakota’s capital since 1889. The tallest building in the state, the North Dakota State Capitol, is located in the city. Bismarck is also a hub for health care and retail.

3. Grand Forks

The city of Grand Forks has a population of 52,838. It is the state’s third most populous city and the county seat of Grand Forks County. It is situated on the western banks of the Red River of the North and is prone to flooding. The economy of Grand Forks is based on health care, food processing, defense, manufacturing, and scientific research. The University of North Dakota, which is the state's oldest institution of higher learning, is also located in Grand Forks.

4. Minot

Minot is the fourth most populated city in North Dakota, with a population of 40,888. It was established in 1886 and serves as the county seat of Ward County. A large US Air Force base is located near the city, and Minot serves as an important regional trading center. Given its remarkable growth within a relatively short period of time, Minot earned the nickname "The Magic City."

5. West Fargo

Located in Cass County, West Fargo has a population of approximately 25,830. Established in 1926, it is North Dakota’s fifth largest city and one of the fastest growing cities in the state.

Why Is North Dakota so Sparsely Populated?

North Dakota has a population density of only 3.83 people per square km, which ranks as the country’s fourth-least densely populated state. Although all incorporated municipalities in North Dakota are classified as cities, most are smaller in population than cities in many other US states. North Dakota has vast stretches of fertile soil and rich mineral resources that make agriculture and mining the state's most important economic activities. Additionally, most of North Dakota is covered by farms and ranches. In fact, wheat is cultivated in nearly every county. Therefore, the state has a very small urban population and is sparsely populated.

List of the 10 Biggest Cities in North Dakota

Rank City Population (2010 census) County

1 Fargo 105,549 Cass
2 Bismarck 61,272 Burleigh
3 Grand Forks 52,838 Grand Forks
4 Minot 40,888 Ward
5 West Fargo 25,830 Cass
6 Mandan 18,331 Morton
7 Dickinson 17,787 Stark
8 Jamestown 15,427 Stutsman
9 Williston 14,716 Williams
10 Wahpeton 7,766 Richland

•By Oishimaya Sen Nag

•culled from www.worldatlas.com






Wednesday, 8 April 2020

What Is the Capital of North Carolina?

The state flag of North Carolina.
The capital city of North Carolina is Raleigh.

Raleigh is the state capital of North Carolina and is also the administrative capital of Wake County. Raleigh covers an area of 144.8 square miles and has a population of over 450,000 residents, making it the second largest city in North Carolina. Despite being the administrative capital of Wake County, a small part of Raleigh’s territory lies in a different county, Durham County. Raleigh is one of the fastest growing in the United States, and in 2015 the city was named by Forbes as “the best place for businesses and careers.”

When Did Raleigh Become Capital?

Bath was the first capital of North Carolina, from 1705 until 1722, and was also the colony’s oldest town. Edenton was later picked as North Carolina’s capital, from 1722 until 1743, when the seat of government was transferred to New Bern, which was then the largest city in North Carolina. During the American Revolution of the mid-18th century, British troops sieged New Bern, which prompted American authorities to select a new, safer located in which to establish a new capital. Raleigh fit that description, and was chosen in 1788 for its central positioning in North Carolina. The site had no prior settlement, making Raleigh one the few US cities to be established specifically as a capital. The city was named after Sir Walter Raleigh, who founded the lost Roanoke Colony in North Carolina.

Demographics of Raleigh

Raleigh’s population has grown from the 669 persons recorded in the 1800 census to over 400,000. The city has a population density of 2,800 persons per square mile. Records from the most recent census show that 57.5% of the population is Caucasian, while 29.3% of Raleigh’s population is described as African American. Native Hawaiians are the smallest race in Raleigh, accounting for less than 0.1% of the city’s population. Raleigh’s population is relatively young, where 36.8% of the population is below the age of 24 years. Statistics from 2000 show that the median annual income per household in Raleigh was $46,612, and 11.5% of Raleigh residents live below the poverty line.

Economy of Raleigh

Raleigh has a bustling service industry, which is one of its most significant economic contributors. The finance and banking industry is another important sector of Raleigh’s economy. North Carolina’s Research Triangle, a large research complex is located in the city, is one of the largest research institutions in the United States. The research complex was established in 1959 and immediately impacted the economy of the city, as it quickly became one of the most important sources of employment for local residents. The biotech and pharmaceutical industries are also vital economics pillar in Raleigh. Several major companies in these economic sectors have headquarters in Raleigh, including Golden Corral, Waste Industries, Martin Marietta Materials, and Red Hat.

Education System in Raleigh

Raleigh was named by Time in 2011 as the third most educated city in the country, which is a testament to the city’s excellent education system. Several world-class institutions of high learning have campuses in Raleigh, including Wake Technical Community College, Duke University, Shaw University, and North Carolina State University.

•By Benjamin Elisha Sawe

•culled from www.worldatlas.com



The Biggest Cities In South Carolina

Columbia is South Carolina's biggest city.
Columbia is South Carolina's biggest city.

The Southern US state of South Carolina is home to a population of 4,625,401 inhabitants. It is the country’s 24th most populous state. With an area of 77,856.9 square km, it is the 40th most extensive US state. South Carolina has 46 counties and 269 incorporated municipalities. Although these municipalities cover only 5.8% of the state’s total land mass, they host 35.4% of the population. The municipalities can vote to be designated as a city or a town but there are no legal differences between the two as per state laws. The municipalities can also choose to have one of three forms of government, council-manager, mayor-council, or council.

Biggest Cities in South Carolina

1. Columbia

Columbia, the capital city of South Carolina, is the largest city in the state. The 2010 Census found the city’s population to be 129,272 individuals. Columbia serves as the seat of the Richland County and a part of it extends into Lexington County. It is the primary city of South Carolina’s Midlands region and is situated at the confluence of two rivers, the Broad River and the Saluda River. These rivers merge to form the Congaree River. The University of South Carolina is also based in Columbia. Fort Jackson, the country’s biggest Basic Combat Training facility, is also located in the city.

2. Charleston

With a population of 120,083 individuals, Charleston is the state’s second most populated city. It is also the oldest city in South Carolina and the county seat of Charleston County. It was established in 1670 as Charles Town. Today, it is located on the Charleston Harbor along the state’s coastline on the Atlantic Ocean. In 1783, Charleston was incorporated as a city. It is known for its rich and well-preserved history and hospitable people. Over the years, Charleston has earned numerous accolades including "America's Most Friendly [City]” title by Travel + Leisure in 2011.

3. North Charleston

North Charleston is the third most populated city in South Carolina. It is home to a population of 97,471 people. The city spreads into three counties, Dorchester, Berkeley, and Charleston. The city was incorporated in 1972 and since then it has experienced rapid population growth. North Charleston is one of South Carolina’s major industrial hubs and has the highest gross retail sales in the city.

4. Mount Pleasant

The suburban town of Mount Pleasant is South Carolina’s fourth-biggest urban area. It had a population of 67,843 individuals in 2010. It is located in Charleston County on the east side of the Charleston Harbor.

5. Rock Hill

With a population of 66,154 individuals, Rock Hill is South Carolina’s fifth most populous city. It is located in York County where it offers scenic views of the Catawba River’s riverfront. 31 parks, numerous nature trails, and restaurants dot the city. The Winthrop University, a liberal arts university founded in the 19th century, is located here.

The Smallest Municipalities in South Carolina

With only 45 residents, Smyrna is the least populous municipality in the state. Jenkinsville, South Carolina’s smallest municipality by area, occupies an area of only 0.23 square km.

The Biggest Cities In South Carolina

Rank Name Government type County
Population (2010) Land area (2010) in km2

1 Columbia Council-manager Lexington Richland 1,29,272342.4
2 Charleston Mayor-council Berkeley Charleston1,20,083282.3
3 North Charleston Mayor-council Berkeley Charleston Dorchester 97,471189.6
4 Mount Pleasant Council Charleston 67,843116.8
5 Rock Hill Council-manager York 66,15492.5
6 Greenville Council-manager Greenville 58,40974.3
7 Summerville CouncilBerkeley Charleston Dorchester 43,39246.7
8 Sumter Council-manager Sumter 40,52483.1
9 Hilton Head Island Council-manager Beaufort 37,099107.1
10 Florence Council-manager Florence 37,05654.1

•By Oishimaya Sen Nag

•culled from www.worldatlas.com


Sunday, 5 April 2020

The Largest Cities in North Carolina

Raleigh, one of the largest cities in North Carolina.
Charlotte, Raleigh, and Durham are among the most populated cities in North Carolina.

North Carolina boasts of a population of at least 10.2 million residents ranking the state as the 9th most populous in the United States. With the large population in the state, not a single one of the cities hosts more than a million residents, and this could be as a result of the fact that North Carolina is subdivided into a hundred counties. While Raleigh is the capital, Charlotte is the largest city in the state. Durham and Greensboro also rank among the four largest cities in North Carolina.

The Largest Cities in North Carolina

Durham

Durham ranks fourth among the largest cities in North Carolina. The 2010 census put the population at about 228,000. This number is estimated to have risen by about 17.26% by 2017 putting the population at 267,743. This city is home to the reputed Duke University and North Carolina Central University. Additionally, Durham also sits as one of the vertices of the Research Triangle which is America’s largest research park.

Greensboro

Greensboro is the largest city and the seat of its host county Guilford. It is also the 3rd most populous city in the state of North Carolina, and the 68th most populous city in the whole country. As of 2010, the population was approximately 269,666 residents, and by 2017 the estimate was put at 290,222. Before 1895, the name of the city was spelled as Greensborough. Three major interstate highways in the Piedmont region were built with Greensboro as their confluence. History tells of a village that has been rocked by war and turbulence. However, in the 1890s, with the restoration of textile plants and related businesses, Greensboro dramatically transformed from a village to a major city.

Raleigh

The state capital of North Carolina is the second largest city in the state after the city of Charlotte. The city is also known as the City of Oaks thanks to the multitude of oak trees lining the streets at the city centre. By land area, Raleigh holds about 142 square miles which is home to the city’s large population of more than 464,758. The population is estimated to be growing at a steady rate of 2% per year putting it among the fastest-growing cities in the United States. Raleigh’s political importance accounts partly for its growth. The development of the Research Triangle Park created jobs in science and technology research leading to the growth of the city.

Charlotte

Charlotte is the largest city in the state and rivals Jacksonville in Florida for the title of the biggest city in the south-eastern United States. It is the county seat of the county of Mecklenburg. As of 2017, the city of Charlotte had a population of 859,035 placing it as the 17th most populous city in the country. The whole metropolitan area is the 22nd largest in the country, and it had a population of 2,474,314 in 2016. The city of Charlotte is of the headquarters of the Bank of America. The growth of Charlotte is rooted in the city’s financial sector. Debatably Charlotte has also been touted to have the best nightlife in North Carolina and possibly the southern parts of the country.

Other Cities

North Carolina is home to some of the largest and also the fastest-growing cities in the country. Other large cities in the state of North Carolina include Winston-Salem, Wilmington, Fayetteville, and High Point. These cities are all home to more than 100,000 residents each.

The Largest Cities in North Carolina

Rank City Population

1 Charlotte 859,035
2 Raleigh 464,758
3 Durham 311,640
4 Greensboro 290,222
5 Winston-Salem 244,605
6 Fayetteville 209,899
7 Cary 165,904
8 Wilmington 119,045
9 High Point 111,513
10 Greenville 92,156
11 Concord 92,067
12 Asheville 91,902
13 Gastonia 76,593
14 Jacksonville 72,447
15 Chapel Hill 59,862

•By Joseph Kiprop

•culled from www.worldatlas.com
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