Tuesday, 26 January 2016

BADAGRY: A GIMPSE OF LAGOS' FAMOUS TOURIST SITE

By kimberley Okonkwo
Badagry has been proved to be one of the fascinating tourist sites in Lagos.
It also has one the best scenery that serves as good location for music video shoots.
One of the attractions is that it is a town bordering on a coast between Seme and Benin Republic.
Tourists who have had the opportunity to visit the town, which is a home to a decent part of Lagos population say the neighboring countries are just a few kilometers away.
The border town to Republic of Benin and Seme is often described as a potent as it generates the highest Nigeria Customs duties income till date.
Badagry residents survives largely on fishing and agriculture, and maintains a small museum of slavery. The town consists of dwellers from all over the country, living through various means in the town. Some trade in clothing, food items, used cars from overseas and other imported goods.
Interestingly, the first educational system of Nigeria as a British colony started in Badagry where the first primary school was built and named "St. Thomas(Anglican) Primary school in 1845. The first secondary school in Badagry was built over one hundred years later called Badagry Grammar School in 1955. In 1863, the town was added as an extension by the United Kingdom and introduced as a part of the Lagos colony. It became a part of Nigeria in 1901.
The name Badagry, originated from the people's means of livelihood which is farming, fishing and salt making due to the availability of trees and presence of ocean water respectively. The natives believed that Badagry was founded by a famous farmer called "Agbedeh" who maintained a farm which became popular it was named after him. The word Greme meant farm in "Ogu" language and a visit to Agbedeh's farm brought about the word and "Agbedegreme" and its usage meaning Agbedeh's farm. It was then coined to "Agbadagari" by the Yoruba inhabitants and later corrupted to Badagry by the European slave merchants before the end of the seventeenth century.

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